Padmavat

by Purushottam Agrawal, illustrated by Devdutt Patnaik

After reading expansively on Padmavat and it’s different versions I had decided to finally get over the saga and move on. Different Padmavats that I had been reading were nothing close to the epic poem that Malik Muhammad Jayasi has written in the sixteenth century. I was really excited to have received this version by Purushottam Agrawal that talks about Jayasi’s version of the story. This book is beautifully illustrated by Devdutt Patnaik whom I... continue reading→

cover: Padmavat

Twilight Falls on Liberalism

by Rudrangshu Mukherjee

‘The book grows out of a particular contemporary conjuncture which is not just Indian but perhaps global. It is not merely political but ideological.’ We all use ‘liberalism’ in our speech quite liberally while we talk about politics these days. And it is not just in India but globally. We all seem to take the word for granted. We tend to forget that it is not a mere political ideology but it is deeply set... continue reading→

cover: Twilight Falls on Liberalism

Peach

by Emma Glass

I found Peach while I was randomly checking out new releases in my favourite book shop in town. My eyes fell on the cover and the author had my attention from the very first sentence. ‘Thick stick sticky sticking wet ragged wool winding round the wounds, stitching the sliced skin together as I walk, scraping my mittened hand against the wall.’ I read sentences after sentences till I finished the first page and decided I... continue reading→

cover: Peach

Animals Eat Each Other

by Elle Nash

I was going through a reading slump when I decided to pick this one up. I had read a different book from Dzanc publishers last year called ‘The Pavilion of Fomer Wives’ which contrary to popular opinions I enjoyed. When I began reading ‘Animals Eat Each Other’ I thought of it as brave but I tired soon. After three strenuous hours put into this book I have decided to be more careful with the next... continue reading→

cover: Animals Eat Each Other

Convenience Store Woman

by Sayaka Murata, translated from Japanese by Ginny Tapley Takemori

A convenience store is a forcibly normalised environment. I came across this book on Claire’s YouTube channel when she was mentioning the books she had accumulated. The title did seem odd and I wanted to read a Japanese fiction after my tryst with ‘Men Without Women’ by Murakami. I must say, this book has me stunned! I have loved each and every part of the book. I have sympathised with Keiko and applauded at the... continue reading→

cover: Convenience Store Woman

Serious Men

by Manu Joseph

I heard Manu Joseph on the stage during the Bangalore Literature Festival of 2017. He’d appeared on a talk about crime in fiction. During the talk, one of the writers read a short passage from her novel—the passage was about sloppy sex between what seemed like a female serial killer and her victim. It was so boring I did not listen. Joseph took a direct dig at her mentioning how he’d once read such a... continue reading→

cover: Serious Men