Ram Iyer

Writer, PowerShell addict, typographer, self-acclaimed rationalist.

Bangalore, KA ramiyer.me 18 posts

Breaking Point

Usha Mahajan, translated from Hindi by Khushwant Singh

Somehow, this book, Our favourite Indian Stories, seems to have a lot of stories about human relationships. Breaking Point is another such story. The story starts with Neera waiting for Madhukar at a restaurant. Quickly, it gets to the point at which Neera asks Madhukar if he loves her. Madhukar seemed to be this typical man who is scared of commitment; he avoids answering the question and the duo leave the restaurant without even having... continue reading→

Like a Pigeon

Rajendra Awasthi

I grew up reading Bal Bharti in my Hindi class. It used to be full of stories from all over India, written by several Indian Hindi writers. I kind of got the same feel and rememebered my Hindi teacher upon reading this story. This story is about an Indian Administrative Services (IAS) officer, who’s on his way to Allahabad. Sitting in the train, he remembers the days of his childhood, how he used to play... continue reading→

Under Cover of Darkness

Nirmal Verma, translated from Hindi by Jai Ratan

Dark stuff. I think I’m attracting some dark stuff of late. The last story I read was a dark one as well. Anyway, this story has a child as the narrator. He’s ill, in Simla. It starts with his friend standing next to him, worried that he’d get well soon, and subsequently, would leave for Delhi. The story slowly evolves into something way more serious than that. More than the storyline, it is about the... continue reading→

Enlightenment

Yashpal, translated from Hindi by Keshav Malik

Amazon is creepy. But of course, not the point. I picked up this book and started reading the stories one by one. The first I read was by Premchand. But the story was too normal. Nothing noteworthy about the story. So I moved on to the next one. This started with a little description about a hermitage. “… away from temptations of earthly bonds” caught my attention at once. I dug in. The story went on... continue reading→

Puerile Delusion

Preeti De Sarkar

All right, what am I to do when my friends write short stories and I like them! Puerile Delusion is a short story by another blogger friend. Ex-blogger, actually; she doesn’t blog anymore. As the title suggests, this story is of a child; a little girl whose only sister has been ill for what seems like a long time. The little one is close to her sister, so much that they “[didn’t] need words to... continue reading→

Hope Hidden in Hibiscus

Shruthi EN

Hope Hidden in Hibiscus is a very short story by a friend. I do not want to make this post longer than the story itself, so I’m going to make this post as brief as possible. The story is of a girl who just saw her father furious over what she did. She’s just five years old, and has taken up her share of responsibilities at home. The story begins with her father yelling at... continue reading→

Northeast Regional

Emma Cline

Parenting is something every human being over fourteen has commented on; whether as the child or the parent. We’ve all had our parents complain about us that we don’t understand them, and we’ve all in turn, as teenagers or otherwise, complained how our parents don’t “get” us. The gap’s ever-existent. I chanced upon this story on New Yorker yesterday. I picked it up for the illustration as well as the title—more like I did not... continue reading→

The Tree Bears Witness

by Sharath Komarraju

Birbal is a familiar name in every household. We’ve all watched our own share of episodes of Akbar–Birbal, or read our share of comics on the duo. There have been all kinds of jokes made about the duo as well. So when I received this email from Veena about Westland sending out the review copy to me, I went over to Goodreads to see what the book was about. The blurb intrigued me. Follow Cover... continue reading→

Birbal is a familiar name in every household. We’ve all watched our own share of episodes of Akbar–Birbal, or read our share of comics on the duo. There have been all kinds of jokes made about the duo as well. So when I received this email from Veena about Westland sending out the review copy to me, I went over to Goodreads to see what the book was about.

The blurb intrigued me.

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The Missing Mail

R.K. Narayan

It’s really uncommon for an Indian who’s read even little English in his school to not know R.K. Narayan—I fondly call him the Story Grandpa of India; well, the Millennials, at least. Most of us have read at least a work of his or two as part of our curriculum. Others would still know him thanks to Doordarshan’s version of Malgudi Days. I’m a gawaar guy as opposed to these city-kids my friends at Meraki Post... continue reading→

The Proxy

It’s common for us in India to have a Literature class or a Moral Sciences class, or an Environmental Sciences class replaced by something “more important”, like Mathematics, or Physics. Or Sports, for that matter. And we’ve all been victims of this setup at some point of our school life. The logic behind such a choice is clear: Mathematics and Physics help you find the right college to launch your career from. Of course, our... continue reading→

cover: The Proxy